Aunty online chat now - Who invented radioactive dating used for the turin shroud

At one point, a number of churches claimed the one foreskin of Jesus, and there were enough splinters of the "True Cross" that Calvin said the amount of wood would make "a full load for a good ship." The list of absurdities and frauds goes on, and, as Pope Leo X was depicted as exclaiming, the Christ fable has been enormously profitable for the Church.As we will see, the Shroud of Turin may be added safely to this lengthy list of "pious frauds" committed by believers and vested interests who wish to shore up their faith.It must be therefore asked why force, forgery and fraud were needed to spread the "good news" brought by a "historical son of God." Despite claims to the contrary, carbon-14 dating conducted in 1988 has proved the shroud cloth was created during the 13th or 14th centuries AD/CE.

who invented radioactive dating used for the turin shroud-52

This is verified by recent scientific investigation which found paint in the image areas.

The Shroud of Turin is also not consistent with Gospel accounts of Jesus' burial, which clearly refer to multiple cloths and a separate napkin over his face.

Carbon-14 dating has demonstrated that the shroud is a 14th-century forgery and is one of many such deliberately created relics produced in the same period, all designed to attract pilgrims to specific shrines to enhance and increase the status and financial income of the local church.

About the beginning of the 9th century, bones, teeth, hair, garments, and other relics of fictitious saints were conveniently "found" all over Europe and Asia and triumphantly installed in the reliquaries of every church, until all Catholic Europe was falling to its knees before what Calvin called its anthill of bones.... Luke was touted as one of the ancient world's most prolific artists, to judge from the numerous portraits of the Virgin, painted by him, that appeared in many churches.

Some still remain, despite ample proof that all such portraits were actually painted during the Middle Ages.

About 1200, Constantinople was so crammed with relics that one may speak of a veritable industry with its own factories.

Blinzler (a Catholic New Testament scholar) lists, as examples: letters in Jesus' own hand, the gold brought to the baby Jesus by the wise men, the twelve baskets of bread collected after the miraculous feeding of the 5000, the throne of David, the trumpets of Jericho, the axe with which Noah made the Ark, and so on...

The Shroud of Turin is a world-famous piece of cloth alleged to have been the burial garment of Jesus Christ. In this analysis, it should be kept in mind that the story of Jesus Christ in the New Testament and other Christian texts is demonstrably fictional, created in order to unify the Roman Empire under one state religion.

The shroud is held up by believers as evidence not only of Christ's existence but also of his divinity. In doing so, the Church forged hundreds of texts, which were constantly reworked, mutilated and interpolated over the centuries.

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