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Colleges are hosting "sex weeks" to explore topics like sexual health, LGBT issues, the intersection of love and religion, or the "hook-up culture." Joining me is Daniel Reimold, an assistant professor of journalism at the University of Tampa and author of "Sex and the University: Celebrity, Controversy, and a Student Journalism Revolution." As part of his research, he read more than 2,000 sex columns written by 120 student journalists at schools of all types and sizes.

He also runs one of my favorite blogs, College Media Matters, and can answer questions about student media. , I interviewed nearly 150 student sex columnists and read thousands of student sex and relationship columns.

Believe it or not, these columns are redefining journalism-- and also defining the current campus sex and socializing scene. As one columnist told me, “We’re not Baby Boomers or part of Generation X. Editors at most student newspapers treat it like any other position.

Jenna Johnson will be joined by Dan Reimold, Assistant Professor of Journalism at University of Tampa and author of the book "Sex and the University: Celebrity, Controversy and a Student Journalism Revolution," to chat about love and sex on college campuses.

Campus Overload's Jenna Johnson introduces you to ambitious student leaders, journalists, activists, interns and newsmakers from colleges across the country in her blog daily.

In her live chat, she'll be answering your questions about college life, on and off campus. With Valentine's Day coming up, I figured it would be a good day to chat about sex on campus.

Obviously, sex has always been a part of college life -- but in recent years we have seen a boom in the number of student sex columnists, magazines and blogs.

Typically no administrative or other outside approval is necessary.

From everything I've come across while writing the book, I'd definitely advise a sit-down with the columnist early on to help nail down how far he or she can go and what topics might be out of bounds-- and to warn them that they will enjoy the perks and downsides of the celebrity that comes from writing about such an intimate topic. This area of student sex is still regarded by students in 2011 as the most taboo-- at least in terms of talking about it openly.The many student columnists with whom I spoke repeatedly referred to anal sex as the most controversial subject they wrote about, the one making their editors most nervous and often garnering the most reader complaints.It seems to be linked to both a general gross-out factor and the pure "journalism shock" of turning a newspaper page and seeing such an explicit activity being discussed. Excellent question, and of course your compliment is appreciated!To write your book (which I encourage every student editor out there to read), you read more than 2,000 sex columns written by more than 120 students. The worst columns are those that rely on the once-tried-but-no-longer-true stereotypes fed into society by everyone from Ann Landers to Carrie Bradshaw. They are active participants in the same sexual and social universe that their student readers inhabit.As one columnist told me, “We’re in the trenches with other students.We see the world they see, you know, more than any outsider could.

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