Swiss dating in english

Who else thinks their English is getting worse the longer they are here? I have noticed my that my regular vocabulary has definitely decreased since leaving the UK. " there are loads more, but I don't really hear them anymore....China Wholesale | Security & Privacy | Help | China Manufacturers | Seller Home | New Products | Top Searches | Search Products | Products Online | Refined Products | Discount Products | China Suppliers | Cheap Products | Prices | Reviews | UK Products | Hot Products |Customer Service | Terms of Use | Russian | Portuguese | Italian | Spanish | French | German | Turkey Copyright Notice © 2004 - 2016 All rights reserved.

swiss dating in english-58

And does anyone know of similar circumstances where they are used to hearing the Swiss use an English word or phrase in the wrong context? My Irish colleague and I tried to do this after we heard Avid Merrion's saying "thankyou please" on his show.

There are words hich sound similar in German and English that often get confused ("become" and "bekomme" are two that spring instantly to mind), so you can get some quite amusing sentences because of those, such as "I become a steak," though I confess I've never actually heard that. I love the group emails I get at work (from people I work with and other companies) when written in English. my husband asked me once "why do you always use the word doh? Unfortunately it didn't catch on with the locals, mostly because we'd always giggle when we said it. " "My boss had a terrible disorder in his office" "The rabbits were all action in Migros" My favourite came from a Greek student who I taught English. " "My boss had a terrible disorder in his office" "The rabbits were all action in Migros" My favourite came from a Greek student who I taught English.

They sometimes start the email with, Hello together, being the direct translation of Hallo Zusammen. She asked my If I had seen that great English film called "Sex Beer and Love" - well that's exactly what it sounded like. She asked my If I had seen that great English film called "Sex Beer and Love" - well that's exactly what it sounded like.

First and foremost let me say that I find it incredible not just how many Swiss speak English, but how well they speak it as well. I haval also noticed that I use a lot more colloqial American than I used to - I belive that "American English" is closer to the "international English" - or maybe people see more American TV than British.....

It has done a lazy git like myself absolutely no favours whatsoever when it comes to learning their language! There are words hich sound similar in German and English that often get confused ("become" and "bekomme" are two that spring instantly to mind), so you can get some quite amusing sentences because of those, such as "I become a steak," though I confess I've never actually heard that. One of my German colleagues at work has a rather unfortunate habit of confusing the words somebody/nobody/anybody and also something/nothing/anything.

I sometimes get asked really interesting questions. A few weeks ago our boss was absent for several hours and he hadn't notified us he'd be away, which is highly unusual.

Like what the difference between the words "however" and "although" is. My colleague remarked on the boss' uncharacteristic absence by saying "Gee, I sure hope something's happened to him! Conversely, I always confuse 'Tankhaltstelle', when meaning 'Tankstelle' (Petrol station) with 'Tramhaltstelle' (Tramstop).

Not something I think a natural speaker ever thinks of because it comes so naturally, but, when asked to explain, it proves quite a challenge to articulate what you know! But I read the Guardian, so there's no hope 'Entschuldigungen' took a long time to unlearn...

The guy I share an office with speaks English pretty well. I love the group emails I get at work (from people I work with and other companies) when written in English. "Hello together" is something I often hear as well. " Then I'd be able to gauge the success of my machiavellian plan by seeing how widespread its use by the Swiss talking English became...

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